Posted on April 26th, 2011 by

As reported recently in The Union Leader, a land owner in northern New Hampshire recently contracted for a property appraisal, with an eye on what change might result if The Northern Pass project were completed in the vicinity.

A copy of the appraisal report is available here.

To reiterate our initial reaction to this appraisal – we have significant concerns regarding its analysis and its credibility. To suggest, as it does, a reduction in property value of 63 – 92 percent seems to fly in the face of  previously published studies and reports related to power lines and property values. (One example is here.) Curiously, the conclusion also seems at odds with the results of the appraisal’s primary and secondary research (See pages 44 – 47 of the appraisal).

The project team is currently working on the development of valuation material, which will be shared publicly when completed.


Posted on April 26th, 2011 by

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  • Jim Dannis says:

    Thank you for providing an initial response to the appraisal we commissioned. We respectfully disagree with your preliminary comments.nnAs investors, we would value the negative impact of the transmission lines in the same ranges provided in the appraisal. This has also been confirmed by leading real estate professionals in the region.nnCuriously, you did not respond to the fundamental concerns (indeed, the very question of relevance!) we raised in our April 12 scoping comment regarding the appraisal materials posted on your website. As you know, the appraisal materials you posted are merely a compilation of studies that do not relate to Northern Pass or the transmission line impact in New Hampshire.nnWe continue to believe that a fact-based, objective discussion would be useful on this matter and many others. We hope that our efforts to commission professional third-party reports as a counterpoint to Northern Pass’s assertions may be helpful in this regard. At this point, we have provided an appraisal specific to actual properties that may be impacted by the transmission lines. Northern Pass has provided only a “study of studies” that does not, to our knowledge, even include any studies of New Hampshire properties.nnWe look forward to reviewing your updated materials that will hopefully be more relevant and will address property value impacts in the unique and particular circumstances of rural New Hampshire. This is a fundamentally important issue to property owners in New Hampshire, and a responsible dialog will be welcome.nnThank you, nnJim and Sandy DannisnnNote: this comment is submitted at 10:05pm on April 26, 2011

  • Jim Dannis says:

    Thank you for providing an initial response to the appraisal we commissioned. We respectfully disagree with your preliminary comments.nnAs investors, we would value the negative impact of the transmission lines in the same ranges provided in the appraisal. This has also been confirmed by leading real estate professionals in the region.nnCuriously, you did not respond to the fundamental concerns (indeed, the very question of relevance!) we raised in our April 12 scoping comment regarding the appraisal materials posted on your website. As you know, the appraisal materials you posted are merely a compilation of studies that do not relate to Northern Pass or the transmission line impact in New Hampshire.nnWe continue to believe that a fact-based, objective discussion would be useful on this matter and many others. We hope that our efforts to commission professional third-party reports as a counterpoint to Northern Pass’s assertions may be helpful in this regard. At this point, we have provided an appraisal specific to actual properties that may be impacted by the transmission lines. Northern Pass has provided only a “study of studies” that does not, to our knowledge, even include any studies of New Hampshire properties.nnWe look forward to reviewing your updated materials that will hopefully be more relevant and will address property value impacts in the unique and particular circumstances of rural New Hampshire. This is a fundamentally important issue to property owners in New Hampshire, and a responsible dialog will be welcome.nnThank you, nnJim and Sandy DannisnnNote: this comment is submitted at 10:05pm on April 26, 2011

  • Jim Dannis says:

    Thank you for providing an initial response to the appraisal we commissioned. We respectfully disagree with your preliminary comments.

    As investors, we would value the negative impact of the transmission lines in the same ranges provided in the appraisal. This has also been confirmed by leading real estate professionals in the region.

    Curiously, you did not respond to the fundamental concerns (indeed, the very question of relevance!) we raised in our April 12 scoping comment regarding the appraisal materials posted on your website. As you know, the appraisal materials you posted are merely a compilation of studies that do not relate to Northern Pass or the transmission line impact in New Hampshire.

    We continue to believe that a fact-based, objective discussion would be useful on this matter and many others. We hope that our efforts to commission professional third-party reports as a counterpoint to Northern Pass’s assertions may be helpful in this regard. At this point, we have provided an appraisal specific to actual properties that may be impacted by the transmission lines. Northern Pass has provided only a “study of studies” that does not, to our knowledge, even include any studies of New Hampshire properties.

    We look forward to reviewing your updated materials that will hopefully be more relevant and will address property value impacts in the unique and particular circumstances of rural New Hampshire. This is a fundamentally important issue to property owners in New Hampshire, and a responsible dialog will be welcome.

    Thank you,

    Jim and Sandy Dannis

    Note: this comment is submitted at 10:05pm on April 26, 2011